lifeandthyme

Life & Thyme

Stories about food. Tag culinary adventures #lifeandthyme

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"The French baking tradition as we know it also has much to with the introduction of steam-injected ovens and viennoiserie. An Austrian named August Zang brought both viennoiserie and the aforementioned oven necessary for its production to France in 1839. Viennoise simply means “from Vienna,” but refers to all manner of butter-laced, laminated French breads to which we’ve become accustomed. These include brioche, croissant, kouign amann, palmiers and the like. The steam-injected oven also allowed for the production of that quintessential French bread—the baguette." — L&T Contributor @alexpdavis — Baker Alex Davis explores the past, present, future and flavor of bread and all its multicultural counterparts—each with its own expression of terroir. Visit lifeandthyme.com/stories for more. — Photo by L&T Editor in Chief @Antonio
Sunday-side up.⠀ —⠀ Photo by @local_milk from the #lifeandthyme Instagram global community.
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"Each bite of tonnarelli delivers a burst of black pepper and vibrant cheese. The noodles are silky, and the sauce glossy." — L&T Contributor @nicolegulotta ⠀ —⠀ A refreshingly short list of ingredients—black pepper central among them—creates a satisfyingly simple dish in the Roman style preparation of cacio e pepe. Visit lifeandthyme.com/stories for more.⠀ —⠀ Photo by L&T Contributor @avgulotta#lifeandthyme
From the L&T Archives: “I breed my bees to be docile and placid. They are never bored, they have enough space, and they’re healthy, good tempered bees, which means we can have them right close to humans." — Dale Gibson, @bstreetbees ⠀ —⠀ High above London’s city streets, beekeeper Dale Gibson operates a rooftop apiary that provides urban bees a comfortable home in which to produce his Bermondsey Street Honey. Visit lifeandthyme.com/stories for more. ⠀ —⠀ Words & Photos by L&T Contributor @jetandindigo
A little slice of sunshine. ⠀ —⠀ Photo by @goodnessisgorgeous from the #lifeandthyme instagram global community.
“It is about what the drink facilitates rather than the drink itself.” — @josh_the_bon_vivants —⠀ In San Francisco’s Mission District is @trickdogbar , the first bar opened by @josh_the_bon_vivants of @the_bonvivants. Visit lifeandthyme.com/stories for more. ⠀ —⠀ Words by L&T Contributor @verajoyrogov and Photos by L&T Photographers @behindfoodcarts#lifeandthyme
"Despite this rich history, chances are you didn’t read The New York Times or the Michelin Guide to choose the last restaurant you visited. Thanks to the democratic nature of the Internet, you are more likely to read a blog, digital publication, Instagram caption, or app to find somewhere to eat." — L&T Contributor @carlydefilippo — A concise history of how humans have come to share their opinions on food, from French writers and Michelin inspectors to the modern Yelper. Read the full story at the link in our profile. — Photo by L&T Editor in Chief @Antonio
"How do you run a restaurant without water? It’s something a chef isn’t taught in culinary school, or even on the job. Yet with Cape Town facing its worst drought in four hundred years, it’s top of mind; in South Africa’s Western Cape Province, agriculture, agri-processing and tourism are the top three industries." — L&T Contributor @findingumami_capetown ⠀ —⠀ In Cape Town, South Africa, Chef Luke Dale Roberts’ @thetestkitchenct addresses the area’s drought with creative solutions in the kitchen. Visit lifeandthyme.com/stories for more. ⠀ —⠀ Photos by L&T Contributor @clairegunnphoto
"While the restaurant review was born in France, the role of the individual critic shifted—and progressed—dramatically in the English-speaking world. While French critics historically focused on the literary style of their reviews (more so than specific detail about the food itself) and made their presence known at restaurants, twentieth century American journalists—most notably, Craig Claiborne at the The New York Times—applied traditional investigative techniques." — L&T Contributor @carlydefilippo — Today on lifeandthyme.com: A concise history of how humans have come to share their opinions on food, from French writers and Michelin inspectors to the modern Yelper. Read the full story by visiting the link in our profile. — Photo by L&T Founder @antonio#lifeandthyme
"Humans have shared their thoughts about food in literature, personal letters and scientific texts since the earliest days of written language—but have you ever wondered who wrote the first restaurant review?" — L&T Contributor @carlydefilippo — Today on lifeandthyme.com: A concise history of how humans have come to share their opinions on food, from French writers and Michelin inspectors to the modern Yelper. Read the full story by visiting the link in our profile. — Photo by L&T Founder @antonio#lifeandthyme
"The velvet steak, also known as ‘the merlot,’ sits in an area known as the heel in the calf muscle. It has a slightly more rich, red color than the meat around it and a fine grain. It appears fairly thin, but puffs up when it hits the heat. Standing recommends just a quick sear though." ⠀ — In Los Angeles, @jeredstanding of @standingsbutchery provides a guide to cuts of beef, as well as an education on sustainable meat practices. Visit lifeandthyme.com/stories for more. ⠀ —⠀ Story and Photos by L&T Assistant Editor @katfrederick ⠀ ⠀ Illustrations by L&T Contributor @wolfie.cake#lifeandthyme
"The unfertilized eggs of a sturgeon fish—one of the oldest families of fish still in existence—have been consumed for millennia. A dish very similar to caviar appeared in ancient Persian and Greek culture; the version consumed today is credited to Russian aristocracy." —L&T Contributor @michaeltesauro — Today on lifeandthyme.com: The egg may be one of the world’s most widely-consumed foods, but it comes from many sources. We take a look into how eggs are consumed in the U.S. and around the globe, both traditionally, and unconventionally. Read the full story at the link in our profile. — Illustration by L&T Contributor @leyla_torres_watercolors
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